Tag Archives: schools

2017’s education movers and shakers

2017 is already shaping up to be just as eventful as 2016, here’s a list of ten key people in education that are going to be making big decisions, influencing opinion and delivering on some big changes.

It’s clear that since Theresa May took the reins in July her premiership will be defined by one thing, working out the details of what ‘the B word’ will actually mean for the UK. In education her commitment to making ‘Britain a country that works for everyone … not just the privileged few’ seems to translate into one thing – more grammar schools. With £200m already earmarked for their expansion in the last ever Autumn Statement, it’s also clear that the Government seems unlikely to heed any evidence from all those that responded to the consultation, that selective schools might not be the best way to achieve social mobility in a context of -8% real term cuts to school budgets. We can expect a new White Paper and ongoing controversy by the summer.

The SoS Justine Greening will be responsible for driving through the expansion of grammars, but she also has some promising ideas of her own, looking at defining families that are ‘just about managing’, going beyond the increasingly creaky FSM proxy for poverty, and identifying the ‘opportunity areas’ that need focused support. The other big issues on her plate include school budgets, with ongoing concerns about scrutiny of academies and the second stage of the national funding formula consultation – closing 22 March. High needs, early years and special schools are three areas that will need particular attention. With FE and HE back in DfE we can also expect further changes in apprenticeships, area reviews and the next REF. The consultation on the latter (closing 17 March) is likely to result in new approaches to both open access research and impact. Careers is likely to receive ongoing attention too, with mounting criticisms of the current approach and hints at a greater focus on vocational and technical routes. The school workforce will remain another priority for Greening, with an ageing workforce, missed recruitment targets and planned programmes not delivering. It may not have been her policy, but you can also expect the SoS to have to deal with some strong reactions in September when the new 9-1 grades replace A*-G in Maths and English GCSEs, with ‘interim’ 8.5-1 grades for other subjects. For me the white elephant in the room is a long overdue wholesale reassessment of school admissions, though I doubt it will be high on the busy 2017 agenda, beyond some selection-focused quick-fixes.

In opposition Angela Rayner and her predecessor Lucy Powell are likely to continue to be a vocal double-act in opposition to the Government’s plans, especially on grammar schools.

Natalie Perera seems to be gearing up to be the de-facto Liberal Democrat education spokesperson (sorry John Pugh MP), with the power of EPI behind her and many years of experience in the DfE, it’s safe to say she and the team will continue to be vocal scrutinisers of Government plans.

At Ofsted we can expect a new, more conciliatory tone from Amanda Spielman and her new team, who will be looking at the impact of inspections on staff. Hopefully this will help teachers to prioritise and so address workload issues such as marking (an area where EEF and NCTL are working to improve the evidence base about good practice). The wellbeing and mental health of both children and staff are likely to be priorities for Ofsted in 2017, with a Select Committee inquiry underway in this area.

In January Dame Alison Peacock will officially start as CEO of the emerging Chartered College of Teaching. Tasked with making education evidence more relevant and practical to busy staff, she is likely to help look at the issue of marking too. Hopes are high for the College but it will take time to build momentum across the profession. Watch out for Founding Membership on 18 Jan.

At the helm of SchoolsWeek we can also expect Laura MacInerney to be a powerful voice for ‘the fourth estate’. Her team’s data and FOI–driven investigations are likely to keep the Government on its toes, especially around free schools, academies and grammar schools.

At Education Datalab, Dr Becky Allen and team have made a huge impact in their first year, combining academic rigour with a slick press operation. We predict some particularly powerful infographics and stats on 19th January when the annual performance and results datasets are published.

Last but by no means least; Professor Becky Francis is likely to help lead the considerable weight of the UCL IoE to spar in the policy ring more than ever, bringing a pragmatic and values-driven approach.

1 Comment

Filed under British schools, Future HE trends, HE in England, Uncategorized

ICYMI: 2016 in brief

It’s been another busy year in education, before everybody switches off for the holiday season and starts thinking about 2017, I thought it was worth a quick recap of the key events that happened in education over the past year…

January

  1. Overall education spending drops as a proportion of GDP from 5.3% in 2011-12 to 4.4% in 2015-16
  2. Education Select Committee publishes report on Regional School Commissioners

February

  1. Select Committee launches an inquiry into apprenticeships
  2. £4.3m Troops to Teachers scheme delivers … 28 new teachers
  3. Prof. Becky Francis appointed as next Director of UCL Institute of Education (IoE), taking over from Professor Chris Husbands in July

March

  1. George Osborne and Nicky Morgan announce all schools would become academies, then quickly rowed back, with the final death knell for the plans coming in October
  2. Select Committee launches an inquiry into ‘Multi-Academy Trusts (MATs)

April

  1. DfE announces that the three remaining ‘approved’ baseline assessments will no longer be an accountability measure, due to lack of comparability
  2. KS1 SAT spelling and grammar test stopped at short notice

May

  1. Queen’s speech includes new statutory duty for schools to promote the National Citizen Service
  2. Eight new deputy directors appointed to lead RSC offices

June

  1. Despite poll predictions, 52% of the UK voted for #BrExit, it’s still not quite clear what this means
  2. Centre Forum is reincarnated as the Education Policy Institute (EPI) – with a deep war chest, a crack team and a sceptical take on Government policy
  3. Education charities Teaching Leaders and The Future Leaders Trust announce they will merge, becoming Ambition School Leadership in November

July

  1. After an aborted leadership election David Cameron steps down and Theresa May walks into Number 10, replacing Nicky Morgan with Justine Greening as SoS for education
  2. National Governors’ Association (NGA), The Future Leaders Trust (TFLT) and NFER publish research on Executive Headteachers
  3. Amanda Spielman the Chair of Ofqual is confirmed as the next Ofsted Chief Inspector, taking over from Sir Michael Wilshaw in January 2017
  4. Another critical Select Committee inquiry on careers, expect the much anticipated ‘careers strategy’ before summer 2017…

August

  1. Dame Alison Peacock of the Wroxham School announced as new CEO of the Chartered College of Teaching, starting in January 2017
  2. Early years foundation stage profile reinstated as statutory

September

  1. Theresa May’s joint Chief of Staff Nick Timothy credited with masterminding the rather controversial (grammar) Schools that work for everyone ‘consultation’
  2. NFER publish a follow-up report on teacher retention
  3. Select Committee launches an inquiry into ‘primary assessment’

October

  1. On Halloween the Select Committee launches an inquiry into selective education

November

  1. A familiar feeling as the nation wakes up to another unexpected result, Trump for President.
  2. £200m earmarked for grammar schools in the last ever Autumn Statement
  3. NFER published ‘a tale of eight regions’, a follow up report about RSCs
  4. Two ASCL leadership candidates are announced, Chris Kirk and Geoff Barton, with members ‘going to the polls’ in January, and results out 10 February 2017
  5. Social Mobility Commission (SMC) publishes annual State of the Nation report
  6. Select Committee launches an inquiry into ‘Children and young people’s mental health’
  7. Five Select Committees lobby the SoS for statutory PSHE education, some for a second time
  8. Select Committee writes to the DfE with concerns about the transparency and accountability of academy finances
  9. TIMSS and PISA report within a week of each other. NFER publish 20 years of TIMSS in England, TIMSS 2015 in Northern Ireland (full results and key insights), PISA 2015 in Scotland, PISA 2015 for all four UK nations

December

  1. NAO publish report showing a £3bn hole in school finances, with 8% real term cuts and 60.6% of secondary academies in the red
  2. ‘Schools national funding formula – stage 2’ consultation launches, deadline 22 March 2017
  3. NFER publish research on the maths performance of disadvantaged students in England
  4. Primary schools achieve strong KS2 SATs results, despite assessment changes
  5. The National Teaching Service is scrapped
  6. The higher education REF consultation opens

Download a two-page Word version (with clickable URLs) here

Leave a comment

Filed under British schools, HE in England, Uncategorized

Grow your own school leaders

Schools are spending more of their limited resources on recruitment. Our survey of more than a thousand school leaders found the most challenging roles to fill are those with a teaching and learning responsibility (TLR).

I keep hearing about schools paying vast amounts of money to advertise and re-advertise such posts, sometimes never finding anybody. Many schools are looking further afield, getting creative with social media and competing rather than collaborating to find the best people from an ever limited pool.

This isn’t sustainable and we’re still waiting to hear how government is going to help the situation. In time, the college of teaching will be part of the solution, but this doesn’t help those schools that are missing key staff right now. Threatening announcements about greater accountability, sacking school leaders and forced academisation aren’t helpful. We’re hoping to see a more positive, sophisticated and holistic response from Nicky Morgan and colleagues this parliament. We need to encourage graduates to consider teaching as a career option, entice experienced leavers back to the profession and highlight the benefits and opportunities of leadership responsibilities rather than just the risks and challenges.

So, what can schools do? For many, the answer has been to grow their own school leaders because this can be cost effective and a way to develop people who know the school and have the right skills; however, this takes time and can be particularly challenging in stand-alone or small schools.

Here are three strategies I’m seeing more schools use to grow the next generation of senior teachers and school leaders despite, rather than because of, government intervention.

1. Map out your leadership pipeline

Ofsted is explicitly looking for schools to do succession planning, with clear development plans for their middle leaders. This requires senior leaders to map out different scenarios for who might be able to step up into different roles over time. This not only helps to highlight the development needs of existing high-potential staff but also shows any glaring gaps that require fresh thinking from beyond the school.

Doing a good job with succession planning often relies on strong relationships and an appreciation of what motivates different individuals. If done right, helping colleagues to consider the options available in the future can build trust and increase capacity. School leaders need to take the time to get to know their middle leaders, including what drives them and what’s holding them back.

2. Prioritise and invest in good CPD

Many schools have an experienced member of the team taking the lead on professional development, which in turn can be a good learning opportunity for them. Increasingly, we’re seeing schools and groups of schools with directors of teaching and learning, or research leads.

There’s growing evidence that high-performing schools develop a systematic approach to professional learning, so each member of staff is clear about their learning goals, how they align with the school strategy and what impact they have on students.

Professional development often starts with a phase of examining the available evidence and could involve working with external experts, attending TeachMeets, focused time spent on Twitter, literature reviews, reading groups and relevant training. Insights can be reflected on and shared with colleagues to identify what might work best for a particular group of students. The next phase is about testing those approaches through action research, peer coaching, student-led research and lesson study. The final phase of good CPD is about evaluating the impact for students and colleagues; it’s often better to have clear but modest targets to judge any intervention, so you know what does and doesn’t work in your school.

3. Build deep relationships with other schools

The estimated school budget cut of 12 per cent combined with a c.500m surge in students and the decline in graduates all create a perfect storm for school leaders. For many schools, the answer has to be working closer with a wider range of partners. Stand-alone schools and those with weak links to others are likely to struggle in this tough environment.

Recent research in this area has highlighted the importance of having a clear agreement about values and goals right from the start of any partnership. Successful school-to-school collaboration also requires regular communication between a number of different people on either side. Regular face-to-face meetings and online workspaces can help colleagues to share information, suggest improvements and report back to colleagues.

Partnerships can aid recruitment by offering a wider range of leadership opportunities to promising staff and allowing resources to be shared. Discrete leadership assignments and projects, mentoring, coaching and shadowing can all help connect staff between schools and build capacity. In turn, such projects can improve the working practices and mood within a school, which helps with retention and attracting new staff.

More formal options include secondments and job-sharing. People with an explicit mandate to spread good practice between partner schools can help to make the most of existing knowledge and talents.

It’s an increasingly tough environment for schools, but those that work creatively together for the good of their students can achieve a lot. Hopefully, government will start to help the situation sooner rather than later.

First posted through my former day-job, via Teach Secondary.

Leave a comment

Filed under British schools

Nine ways middle leaders can reach beyond their own school (and why they should)

Make no mistake, being a middle leader in a school these days is a tough job. You’re probably spending most of your time teaching and trying to fit leadership and management responsibilities around it. There’s a good chance you proved your abilities teaching your own class and then got given additional responsibilities across the whole school. It’s likely you’ve had little to no training for all that other stuff; instead, you learned most things on the job. Your school probably has a senior leadership team, but no clear group of middle leaders that meets regularly. You’re probably juggling 101 different things, so it doesn’t feel like you have any time to take a step back and lift your head beyond your own school.

One of the privileges of my last role was that I got to visit schools across the country and meet lots of different middle leaders. If any of the concerns mentioned above sound familiar, believe me you’re not alone. In our schools, there are about 200,000 middle leaders and each of whom is teaching on top of their school-wide responsibilities. Given tight budgets and rising expectations of schools, it’s more important than ever before that every middle leader is motivated, supported and satisfied. Increasingly, we need our middle leaders to not only have a positive impact in their own school but also to be excited by the challenges that come with helping colleagues and students further afield. Working beyond your own school could help to improve outcomes for students, and it may also bring you greater satisfaction and a more rewarding career.

Here are nine suggestions for how middle leaders can broaden their horizons beyond their own school.

  1. Make a plan. Start thinking about what you’re trying to achieve. For example, you could ask yourself which students at your school need the most help and where you might learn from others that have supported similar students. Perhaps one of your colleagues is struggling with something, so how might you find out how to help them? And what do you want to do yourself? Are there parts of your job you particularly enjoy, or are there some areas you’re still unsure of? Once you’ve decided on a problem you’d like to fix, work back from there. Try to be as specific and realistic as possible. How might you address it, who do you need to speak to and what’s a realistic time frame? Share your ideas with your line manager and get their feedback and support
  2. Develop your subject leadership. Middle leaders often have an impressive mix of hand-on teaching experience and deep subject knowledge. They may be local champions for their subject and get involved with communities of practice, TeachMeets and subject associations. The moderation of teaching practices across schools can help those involved to learn from each other
  3. Mentor and be mentored. Middle leaders should proactively seek to develop and practise their coaching skills with others. Such relationships can be powerful with peers, junior colleagues, senior staff or even pupils. Remember, it’s important to ask good questions and not just provide the answers in such situations. This encourages the other person to reflect
  4. Use research, evidence and data to inform practice. Middle leaders should be advocates of evidence, sharing insights with colleagues and keen to learn. Lesson study can be a particularly powerful professional development model
  5. Make continuing professional development your own. Middle leaders are increasingly taking responsibility for owning their professional development – finding and evaluating different sources. This can range from formal training to Twitter chats (#UKEdChat, #MLTChat or #SLTChat), blogs or events (#ResearchEd or TeachMeets). You should reflect on what you’ve learned and document the evidence of that learning, even if it’s just a few notes and the time spent
  6. Find a secondment. School can feel like a small place sometimes, especially if it’s not part of a family, federation or trust. If you want to develop new skills, try a different role or tackle a particular challenge, a secondment opportunity could be a great way to do so without losing touch with your home school
  7. Connect with the community. Schools are doing more with less and middle leaders could build relationships with other local stakeholders through specific projects. For example, working with parents and carers to put in place strategies for the early identification of vulnerable children to prevent long-term problems
  8. Trial a new intervention. Middle leaders are typically the ones testing and evaluating a new teaching practice, supplier or learning technology in their school. By comparing notes with others locally and taking an experimental mindset – with a clear and modest measure to judge success – you can quickly work out what’s effective for your students and what isn’t
  9. Be a governor at another school. Working with the senior leadership team and governors of another school can be an enlightening and rewarding experience. All you need to give is a little of your own time

This blog was written for Challenge Partners.

(a version of this blog first appeared through my former day-job)

Leave a comment

Filed under British schools

Ten top tips for conducting staff appraisals

One of the most worrying findings from our recent research with middle leaders was how few had received training or felt confident in conducting staff appraisals. Many of these individuals have become excellent teachers, but they may have had less experience or support when it comes to management tasks, such as formal performance reviews.

Given it’s that time of year again for many, we thought we’d share some suggestions to help you go through this process, either with an NQT (see the statutory guidance from the DfE) or a more experienced colleague. You probably know much of this already, but it’s always worth a refresher. Remember, these principles also hold true for your own appraisals with your manager.

  1. There should be no surprises for either party at a formal, six or twelve-month review session. You should be discussing progress against performance objectives and personal development regularly in line management meetings, not just at appraisal time. We recommend you do this at least once a month. These more informal discussions should include prompt feedback from recent developments as they happen, not stored up as a list for an annual review. Both of you have ongoing responsibilities to the process and each other as part of your management relationship
  1. Both parties should be well prepared for these meetings. Make the time to read the relevant policies in advance and ask for any clarification about the process beforehand. Both of you should also look at previous objectives and documentation, including any notes and summary evidence gathered since the last review. It pays to think through the structure and sequence of what needs to be discussed and the key points under each heading. You can then agree the agenda with each other in advance
  1. Find a suitable location and amount of time to conduct the appraisal. As the manager, you should explicitly create an environment for a professional, frank discussion. Agree the purpose and parameters of the discussion from the start. Such reviews should allow you to briefly reflect on their performance since the last review and to make plans for the future. This can often have implications on pay awards, benefits and responsibilities. Work to a clear, structured agenda and make your own summary notes of the discussion as you go. Be mindful of the time
  1. Use positive, specific feedback wherever possible, especially at the start of the session. Use this as an opportunity to discuss their welfare. Find out how they are and discuss their role to ascertain if there are any workload issues and whether they feel supported by you. Ask open questions about what might have gone even better. Let the appraisee do most of the talking, so they can provide brief evidence of what they’ve achieved and what they’d like to improve on. Try to use careful questioning to invite self-evaluation, reflection and (hopefully) ownership
  1. Try not to make the discussion personal. Instead, focus on behaviours and the results, not personality or emotion. Encourage their specific examples. For example, working through a summary of past events and their outcomes
  1. Try to make the discussion as collaborative as possible by exploring successes and areas for improvement together. You don’t need to have all the answers or solutions; you should encourage the other person to reflect on what’s happened and suggest next steps, guiding them where necessary. Watch out for over- and underestimation, and provide alternative viewpoints or evidence, where appropriate
  1. Keep the focus of the discussion on outcomes, primarily for pupils but also for staff (including themselves). Highlight and praise any evidence they provide of having a positive impact on either pupils or staff
  1. Remember, appraisals are a chance to look at both personal performance and the needs of the wider organisation; you should develop objectives and development goals that try to address both. There should be alignment across other people in the team and the wider organisation. So, for example, if a school has the strategic objective to ‘narrow the gap between pupil premium students and other pupils’, you should have coordinated this together, using your different roles to help you achieve this. As you become more senior, you’ll start to achieve success more through others rather than directly yourself
  1. Aim to end the meeting on a positive note because you want your colleague to leave motivated. They should have a clear plan for how they want to develop themselves within the next period and what performance objectives they should be aiming to achieve. They should also understand what part they need to play, both for the team and the wider organisation. Ultimately, this should be about reasoning how they’ll specifically help pupils to progress. Send them a summary of your notes and compare with any they might have taken
  1. Lastly, although your role as a manager is to explain the appraisal process as it is, you should encourage them to accept and work within it. You can also create an opportunity for reflection and honest feedback about how well this has worked, but do so afterwards, not on the day of the appraisal session itself

I hope these ideas have sparked some of your more positive memories of the appraisals you’ve been involved with in the past, so you can help your team to rise to the challenges ahead of them. Feel free to use the comments section to share any other suggestions.

This blog was written for The Key.

(a version of this blog first appeared through my day-job)

Leave a comment

Filed under British schools

New year resolutions. How many teachers will be entitled to develop this year?

When we asked middle leaders in schools what was holding back their development, the most common answers were time and money. This may seem unsurprising, but it’s also unnecessary and wasteful when there’s this talented group of individuals in schools who are ready for more responsibility if they can get the right support and professional development. In 2015 a new national entitlement to development could start to give emerging leaders in schools the support that professionals in other industries enjoy, helping them to reach their potential. Surely that’s a resolution worth sticking to?

Even though we invest thousands in ‘golden hellos’ for graduates to get them into teaching, we do little to get them to stay in the profession or to transition into leadership roles. Too often time spent on continuing professional development (CPD), including at INSET days, is focused on short-term information-giving and regulatory compliance, rather than sustained personal development that leads to better leaders, teachers and student outcomes.

The government-backed accredited qualifications are one important part of this puzzle. And although we’re waiting to see the latest projections from the National College about the number of school leaders completing the three accredited qualifications (NPQML, NPQSL and NPQH), our own research shows some potentially worrying trends, especially around the former.

Despite seeing the value in such qualifications, the incentives to enrol don’t always seem to be there in many schools. Too many promising and talented teachers aren’t being supported fully when they take on greater responsibilities beyond their own classrooms. This puts their careers, their colleagues and their students at risk.

Why is this the case when doctors can take up to 10 paid days of study or professional leave a year, with all expenses paid and regardless of their employers’ financial position?

The reasons why this group of emerging school leaders aren’t always properly nurtured are complex, involving a mix of in-school and system-wide factors. For example, circumstances don’t always encourage some senior leaders to let go of their staff, or they struggle to find new opportunities for people to step up internally. Middle leaders aren’t always properly recognised, given the right responsibilities or rewarded accordingly. It’s also hard for anybody to spend time and money on meaningful personal development in a context where schools are still adapting to such an intense period of reform and change. The whole area of professional development is an ongoing focus for NAHT Edge. We’re pursuing the issue on all fronts to help improve the situation.

Although they’ll play their part, schools and unions can’t do everything. Whoever governs after May’s general election could help by ensuring sufficient time and money are ring-fenced for emerging school leaders who’ve started to prove their potential. A national entitlement to development could initially feature, say, a modest five days and £5,000 of government-backed funding a year for each TLR one or two post holder who has served a year successfully and met their performance objectives. Making this statutory would ensure a minimum level of support for all emerging school leaders, regardless of in-school circumstances.

Perhaps the funding could include existing CPD-related bursaries and scholarships for Teaching Schools or accredited NCTL qualifications. This would save a lot of new money being required and ensure all middle leaders are supported. Qualified individuals in all schools could then spend the development time and money they’re entitled to as they saw best, including but not exclusively on accredited qualifications. That could make for a much happier new year.

This blog was written for the Teacher Development Trust.

(a version of this blog first appeared through my day-job)

1 Comment

Filed under British schools