Grow your own school leaders


Schools are spending more of their limited resources on recruitment. Our survey of more than a thousand school leaders found the most challenging roles to fill are those with a teaching and learning responsibility (TLR).

I keep hearing about schools paying vast amounts of money to advertise and re-advertise such posts, sometimes never finding anybody. Many schools are looking further afield, getting creative with social media and competing rather than collaborating to find the best people from an ever limited pool.

This isn’t sustainable and we’re still waiting to hear how government is going to help the situation. In time, the college of teaching will be part of the solution, but this doesn’t help those schools that are missing key staff right now. Threatening announcements about greater accountability, sacking school leaders and forced academisation aren’t helpful. We’re hoping to see a more positive, sophisticated and holistic response from Nicky Morgan and colleagues this parliament. We need to encourage graduates to consider teaching as a career option, entice experienced leavers back to the profession and highlight the benefits and opportunities of leadership responsibilities rather than just the risks and challenges.

So, what can schools do? For many, the answer has been to grow their own school leaders because this can be cost effective and a way to develop people who know the school and have the right skills; however, this takes time and can be particularly challenging in stand-alone or small schools.

Here are three strategies I’m seeing more schools use to grow the next generation of senior teachers and school leaders despite, rather than because of, government intervention.

1. Map out your leadership pipeline

Ofsted is explicitly looking for schools to do succession planning, with clear development plans for their middle leaders. This requires senior leaders to map out different scenarios for who might be able to step up into different roles over time. This not only helps to highlight the development needs of existing high-potential staff but also shows any glaring gaps that require fresh thinking from beyond the school.

Doing a good job with succession planning often relies on strong relationships and an appreciation of what motivates different individuals. If done right, helping colleagues to consider the options available in the future can build trust and increase capacity. School leaders need to take the time to get to know their middle leaders, including what drives them and what’s holding them back.

2. Prioritise and invest in good CPD

Many schools have an experienced member of the team taking the lead on professional development, which in turn can be a good learning opportunity for them. Increasingly, we’re seeing schools and groups of schools with directors of teaching and learning, or research leads.

There’s growing evidence that high-performing schools develop a systematic approach to professional learning, so each member of staff is clear about their learning goals, how they align with the school strategy and what impact they have on students.

Professional development often starts with a phase of examining the available evidence and could involve working with external experts, attending TeachMeets, focused time spent on Twitter, literature reviews, reading groups and relevant training. Insights can be reflected on and shared with colleagues to identify what might work best for a particular group of students. The next phase is about testing those approaches through action research, peer coaching, student-led research and lesson study. The final phase of good CPD is about evaluating the impact for students and colleagues; it’s often better to have clear but modest targets to judge any intervention, so you know what does and doesn’t work in your school.

3. Build deep relationships with other schools

The estimated school budget cut of 12 per cent combined with a c.500m surge in students and the decline in graduates all create a perfect storm for school leaders. For many schools, the answer has to be working closer with a wider range of partners. Stand-alone schools and those with weak links to others are likely to struggle in this tough environment.

Recent research in this area has highlighted the importance of having a clear agreement about values and goals right from the start of any partnership. Successful school-to-school collaboration also requires regular communication between a number of different people on either side. Regular face-to-face meetings and online workspaces can help colleagues to share information, suggest improvements and report back to colleagues.

Partnerships can aid recruitment by offering a wider range of leadership opportunities to promising staff and allowing resources to be shared. Discrete leadership assignments and projects, mentoring, coaching and shadowing can all help connect staff between schools and build capacity. In turn, such projects can improve the working practices and mood within a school, which helps with retention and attracting new staff.

More formal options include secondments and job-sharing. People with an explicit mandate to spread good practice between partner schools can help to make the most of existing knowledge and talents.

It’s an increasingly tough environment for schools, but those that work creatively together for the good of their students can achieve a lot. Hopefully, government will start to help the situation sooner rather than later.

First posted through my former day-job, via Teach Secondary.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under British schools

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s